My main research interests lie in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI), a discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive systems, and the study of phenomena surrounding these systems. The main goal of my research in human-computer interaction is to develop an understanding of users and technology to support user interaction. Below I highlight some of my past and current research projects.

A main focus of my research has been exploring the use of gestures in various types of interactions. Projects under this category have examined the use of gestures in various different interactions including: mobile interaction, interactions with wearable computers, and large-display interactions.
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Building on Colorado State University’s strength in Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture research, I have established a research program that aims to support life science research that requires extensive use of computational tools (often referred to e-Science in the literature). My research in this area consists of two main thrusts; research supporting user engagement with genomic analysis tools, and understanding how technology can support large multidisciplinary research projects. The research projects in this domain includes collaborators in computer science, clinical sciences, veterinary medicine, microbiology and immunology, and food science.
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My prior work focused on understanding users by applying established theories in psychology and kinesiology to model end-user performance, which in turn, facilitates interaction. I demonstrated that established laws of motion can be used to derive an equation to model the initial ballistic phase of movement in order to predict movement distance.
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Interfaces that receive the majority of input through an electronic stylus often overload the stylus via software state, creating a set of modes in the interface. Typical examples of these interfaces are found in applications designed primarily for a tablet computer or data tablet, such as Windows Journal and Microsoft OneNote. In these applications a set of software buttons at the top of the screen allows a user to change the state of the tablet interface to support actions such as inking, erasing, highlighting, and editing to create and manipulate content. Prior to my work, these state manipulation operations were shown to be error-prone and have a high temporal cost. To address the temporal cost associated with switching software state, my collaborators and I developed an interaction technique for switching software states that is based on bimanual coordination.
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The goal of this research is to examine the use of large public-shared interactive displays and how mobile devices can enrich interaction around these displays. In shopping malls, amusement parks, airports, and other public spaces, large digital displays are replacing traditional signs as the medium of choice for communicating information to the general public. The advantage of a digital sign is that it can display generic, long-term information, similar to its non-digital counterpart (e.g. a directory or map), in addition to being augmented with information that is timelier for passers-by. For example, a map of a mall or amusement park can be augmented with information on promotions or events that are occurring nearby. Digital displays are thus able to provide information more tailored to viewers' contexts. Their ability to process input also enables interactivity, permitting users to execute information retrieval and/or transactional operations. Together, larger interactive displays can support both multi-group interactions while preserving persistent ambient information for less-engaged passers-by.
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These projects serve to extend both the quality and accessibility of STEM education.
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